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Family Support Groups

Recovery

Supporting those on their addiction recovery journey is a vital part of substance abuse recovery. However, we often forget that those who provide that support need encouragement, education, and support themselves.

Being the parent or family member of an addict can be isolating, stressful, confusing, and lonely.

That’s why family support groups should be a vital part of addiction recovery. At Fellowship Missions, we’ve been able to connect with a local organization, The Mom of an Addict.

The Mom of an Addict offers support group meetings for all family members of an addict. Whether you’re a parent, sibling, grandparent, aunt, uncle, etc, their support group welcomes you.

The Mom of an Addict Family Support Groups

Jennifer Hope and Jeni Streeter formed The Mom of an Addict in June, 2019 both as mothers of sons battling addiction and on their recovery journey. They saw a need for family support based on their own experiences.

“When my son started actively using, I felt alone and I didn’t understand his addiction. I felt like I couldn’t talk to anyone because I was worried about being seen as a bad parent or that my son was a ‘bad kid’. I became socially withdrawn and it was a very lonely time.”

Jennifer Hope, Founder/Director of The Mom of an Addict

Looking back at that time, both Jennifer and Jeni wish they had known more about addiction and how to better support themselves and their children. Their entire worlds revolved around what would and could happen to their sons each day.

“It was a terrifying time for me. I thought it was my job to save my son’s life and nothing else mattered. I wish I had known more about addiction and how it works.”

Jeni Streeter, Secretary of The Mom of an Addict

What To Expect From Family Support Groups

The Mom of an Addict provides two support groups, one located in Fort Wayne and one beginning in Warsaw on May 27.

There are also virtual support groups available, which became vital for loved ones of addicts to connect during the COVID pandemic.

Everyone is welcome at a family support group meeting. The first part of the group is dedicated to education, usually accompanied by a video.

Topics range from how addiction affects the brain, how and why to create healthy boundaries, types of addiction treatment, how to help end the stigma of addiction. Guest speakers are also occasionally brought in to share their stories or unique expertise.

After the education portion of the meeting, attendees break into smaller groups to share about their week. Any updates, good or bad, are always welcome. Connecting with other families in similar situations can be a lifeline for those supporting addicts in recovery.

Connection Through Fellowship Missions

The Mom of an Addict connected with Fellowship Missions when we brought A Bridge To Hope under the Fellowship Missions Addiction Recovery Hub

In 2019, A Bridge To Hope decided to dissolve as an organization and asked Fellowship Missions to expand their services to include support for those suffering from addiction. Jeni and Jennifer connected with Ann Hasse and realized that their family support groups could connect well with Fellowship Missions.

1/10th of the adults in the United States are battling addiction to at least one substance. Unfortunately in Indiana there is a huge lack of family support resources and options. The Mom of an Addict saw a need and stepped in to fill it.

“We want to reach families who are feeling scared and alone and give them a safe place to connect.”

Jennifer Hope, Founder/Director of The Mom of an Addict

Even though the name of their organization is The Mom of an Addict, all family members are encouraged to attend. 

If you are the family member of someone battling addiction or substance abuse, consider attending a family support group. Remember, you’re not alone. Both Fellowship Missions and The Mom of an Addict are here to help.

What good is it, my brothers, if a man claims to have faith but has no deeds? Can such faith save him? Suppose a brother or sister is without clothes and daily food. If one of you says to him, “Go, I wish you well; keep warm and well fed,” but does nothing about his physical needs, what good is it? In the same way, faith by itself, if it is not accompanied by action, is dead.

James 2:14-17, NLT